School Project

A School for Majok-Chedhiop

Help us to bring education to children in Majok-Chedhiop village in Africa, South Sudan.

Now that the village has a healthy, functioning, life-giving well, we have shifted our energies to the next focus in the RSSVP mission statement –
bringing education to Majok-Chedhiop, in South Sudan. 
Why is bringing a school to Majok-Chedhiop so important?
 
South Sudan has the second lowest level of primary school enrollment in the world and the lowest level of secondary school enrollment. It is estimated that more than one million primary school aged children are not in school. What schools that do exist are not conducive to learning. Low rates of primary school completion endanger the health and future of the next generation – especially for women.
According to the CIA World Factbook, the literacy rate for all South Sudan is 27%, with about 40% of males able to read, but only 13% of women.  Currently, school in Majok-Chedhiop is conducted in the shade of a tree, with one teacher, few supplies, and able to serve only a few young children.  A shortage of books, along with overcrowding in classrooms about 40-60 students per one classroom, overcrowding in classrooms has led to many youngsters failing to complete their primary education. Sometimes up to 10 students might have to use the same book. Compounding the problem, teachers are few and often under-trained. Children lucky enough to be in school learn very little.

#FF0000 Raised $3,500 towards the $71,000 target.

Less than 400-600 girls are enrolled in the last grade of secondary school. Early marriage and other socio-cultural practices act to inhibit education for girls and result in gender disparities. Approximately 85 percent of the one million out of school children in the country are from pastoralist families. Children from the wealthiest families are 15 percent more likely to begin primary school than their counterparts from the poorest families. Compounding the problem, children that are lucky enough to be in school learn very little. Lack of books is a huge issue that students in South Sudan have to share textbooks, and sometimes up to 10 students might be trying to read the same book. A shortage of books, along with overcrowding in classrooms about 40-60 students per one classroom, overcrowding in classrooms has led to many youngsters failing to complete their primary education. Estimates by the World Bank indicate that less than 8 percent of students tested in grade 6 were able to achieve higher than 50 percent on a basic Mathematics test, and 30 percent on a Basic English test.

Only around 20% of children complete primary school. Only 95% of the population is literate, qualifying as the worst national literacy rate. The adult literate rate in South Sudan is 27% with 40% males able to read and 13% women. 80% of children aged 6 to 17 years have never set foot in a classroom. The completion rate in primary schools is less than 20%, one of the lowest in the world. Gender equality is another challenge; with only 30% of girls in schools. Many of the schools are neglected and lacking resources. It’s worth noting that only 13% of primary schools offer the full primary cycle, from grade 1 to 8. The chronic shortage of qualified teachers is a serious challenge in South Sudan that directly impedes learning. Many of the teachers haven’t finished primary school themselves. Female teachers, important to improving education for girls, represent just 12 percent of all teachers.

Currently, school in Majok-Chedhiop is conducted in the shade of a tree, with one teacher, few supplies, and able to serve only a few young children.  Because this does not afford a quality education, villagers are reticent about allowing their daughters to attend school, choosing instead to have the girls do household chores and gather water.  However, the parents of Majok-Chedhiop have indicated that they are eager to have their daughters educated at the proposed school.  They realize that the best tool to rebuild the nation of South Sudan they can give their children, both boys and girls, is education.

Therefore, we anticipate a high level of cooperation and assistance with the School Project from local leaders and villagers alike, both in the planning and implementation stages.  In fact, the elders of Majok-Chedhiop have already donated an appropriate plot of land on which to locate the school!

 
Beyond the obvious issues with employ-ability and the lack of hope for bettering their lives, this leaves the South Sudanese people vulnerable to aggression and oppression from outside forces, and keeps these people from taking their rightful place on the world stage today.  With your help, we expect to achieve vastly improved literacy among girls and boys in the 6-16 year old population of Majok-Chedhiop within the first decade of the school’s operation.
 
The parents of Majok-Chedhiop have indicated that they are eager to have their daughters educated at the proposed school.  They realize that the best tool to rebuild the nation of South Sudan they can give their children, both boys and girls, is education. The elders of Majok-Chedhiop have already donated an appropriate plot of land on which to locate the school!
The anticipated costs for our Majok-Chedhiop School include:
$80,000—For a cost to build school building for K-12th
$10,000 – for the school well
$5,000—School supplies for 250 students
$7,500—School Uniforms for 250 students
$10,000—Nutritious meals, for 250 students
$2,500—Fill a classroom with books for 250 students
$2,000—Teacher training and salary for 4 teachers need it
$4,000—Curriculum development
 
You can help. Click on this button to link to secure ways to help the children of South Sudan.

Progress of the M-C School Project

  • Land has been generously donated by the elders of Majok-Chedhiop.
  • Several prominent leaders of Yirol Area have agreed to be the local contacts and also to provide local oversight for the duration of the School Project.  (For more information, see Board Members and Community Advisors under the Who We Are tab.)
  • Local builders with ties to the community have been identified.
  • RSSVP has hired a company to survey the donated land.
  • With the completed survey, we will be able to get an estimate on the cost to build the school.  The plans include initially building four school rooms that can house Primary One through Primary Four.  As funds become available, additional rooms and teachers will be added until grades One through Eight are offered.  In South Sudan, high school students from the villages go to schools located in larger cities.
  • Fundraising is being ramped up.  Besides your generous donations, we are writing for grants from a variety of charitable and educational sources.
  • A revenue stream from agricultural and business enterprises will be sought by which the villagers can achieve self-sufficiency in supporting teacher salaries, building maintenance, and expansion to accommodate upper grades.
 
We are so excited.  With your help, Majok-Chedhiop now has a source of safe, fresh water.  With your continued support, the children of Majok-Chedhiop will have a school with a roof, tables and chairs, books and supplies, blackboards, and qualified teachers.
We cannot adequately convey the gratitude already being expressed by the villagers of Majok-Chedhiop.  They are simply amazed that they are thought about and cared for by people so far away.  They do not take your assistance lightly.  These are hardworking people who are committed to doing whatever they can on their part to work with us in building and maintaining the school.  After all, they very well understand that it is their children, and their community, who will benefit.